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With Grant at Headquarters

ebook

Sylvanus Cadwallader was one of those remarkable figures who stood close by in the shadows of some of the most titanic events of American history. His intimate association with Ulysses S. Grant and members of his staff is unique, especially given his profession as a New York "Herald" war correspondent. General James Harrison Wilson wrote, "He messed with the staff and while he held no official position, he was furnished with shelter and transportation and was treated in all respects as a commissioned officer." That he was fully accepted into Grant's military family is borne out not only by statements in this memoir but by Grant's Chief-of-Staff, John Rawlins, and cavalry commander, Wilson, who wrote the only biography of Rawlins. Cadwallader remained with Grant from Vicksburg to the surrender at Appomattox. Cadwallader earned the trust of Grant and his officers through his ability to report factually while keeping important details secret, including episodes of Grant's drinking. This unique look into Grant's headquarters is exciting, humorous, and an important contribution to our understanding of the great general.


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Publisher: BIG BYTE BOOKS Edition: Abridged, Annotated

OverDrive Read

  • File size: 1314 KB
  • Release date: April 14, 2017

EPUB ebook

  • File size: 1314 KB
  • Release date: April 14, 2017

Formats

OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

Languages

English

Sylvanus Cadwallader was one of those remarkable figures who stood close by in the shadows of some of the most titanic events of American history. His intimate association with Ulysses S. Grant and members of his staff is unique, especially given his profession as a New York "Herald" war correspondent. General James Harrison Wilson wrote, "He messed with the staff and while he held no official position, he was furnished with shelter and transportation and was treated in all respects as a commissioned officer." That he was fully accepted into Grant's military family is borne out not only by statements in this memoir but by Grant's Chief-of-Staff, John Rawlins, and cavalry commander, Wilson, who wrote the only biography of Rawlins. Cadwallader remained with Grant from Vicksburg to the surrender at Appomattox. Cadwallader earned the trust of Grant and his officers through his ability to report factually while keeping important details secret, including episodes of Grant's drinking. This unique look into Grant's headquarters is exciting, humorous, and an important contribution to our understanding of the great general.


Expand title description text